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News

Trump delivers ultimatum to House Republicans: Pass health-care measure on Friday or he’ll move on
<p>President Trump delivered an ultimatum to House Republicans on Thursday night: Vote to approve the measure to overhaul the nation’s health-care system on the House floor Friday, or reject it.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
A Brave Front, but Regrets? On Health Bill, Trump Has a Few
Even as the president has maintained bravado in public, people close to him say he is grappling with bouts of self-doubt as his hopes for a quick health care victory unravel.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Days before his death, Putin critic said he knew he was in danger
The Kremlin denied any links to the slaying of Russian Denis Voronenkov, a former lawmaker, in Kiev.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Officials: N. Korea will launch another nuke test in next few days
North Korea is in the final stages of preparing for another nuclear test, which could come in the next few days, U.S. officials with knowledge of the most recent intelligence from the region told Fox News.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Utah man killed in London attack was hit on bridge
<p>A Utah couple was enjoying the final day of their European trip to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary when they were among the crowd of people on London's Westminster Bridge who were struck by an SUV.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Man wanted in Tenn. teen's disappearance may be in Texas
A man wanted in connection to the disappearance of a Tennessee teen may have been spotted in Texas, authorities there confirmed Thursday afternoon. Corpus Christi police spokeswoman Gena Pena said police were dispatched about 1 p.m. CT to North Beach after a call from Tennessee was forwarded to the police department. North Beach is home to the Texas State Aquarium and the Lexington, an aircraft carrier turned museum. Depending on the route traveled, North Beach could be up to 1,000 miles southwest of Columbia, Tenn., Elizabeth Thomas' hometown. Thomas, 15, was last seen March 13 wearing a flannel shirt and black leggings. The girl's 50-year-old high school teacher Tad Cummins is accused of kidnapping her. Related: Man searched 'teen marriage' before kidnapping Police in Corpus Christi went to the area after a call indicated an SUV with a partially-matched license plate may have been seen. "Units are out there trying to look for the vehicle but nothing has been found," said Pena. Authorities have been looking for a silver Nissan Rogue with Tennessee license plate 976ZPT. Earlier Thursday, the family of a missing Tennessee girl called the last 10 days the most difficult in their lives in a letter that asked for continued prayers. "The family has been overwhelmed with the kindness shown to us by the Maury County (Tenn.) community and beyond," the single-page letter released through attorney S. Jason Whatley reads. "We humbly ask that you continue to pray as we do our best to cope with the emotional weight of Elizabeth's abduction." An AMBER Alert for Thomas was issued March 14. The family's letter continued: "We are desperate for any information that might lead to our daughter. The information that we need is not only from what people have seen and heard after Elizabeth's disappearance, but also from before. Facts about prior events, especially interaction between Elizabeth and Tad Cummins and statements made by both parties to third parties, may very well contain clues to lead to Elizabeth's return... Elizabeth must be found. Time is of the essence." A warrant was issued for Cummins' arrest after the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation suggested he "may have been abusing his role as a teacher to groom this vulnerable young girl for some time in an effort to lure and potentially sexually exploit her." Related: Tenn. authorities searching for missing teen, teacher accused of kidnapping her Cummins taught at Culleoka Unit School, where Thomas was a student, until he was dismissed March 14. He was initially suspended when the Maury County Sheriff's Department began investigating him for sexual contact with a minor. District Attorney General Brent Cooper said Cummins will be charged with the aggravated kidnapping of Thomas, in addition to charges he faces for a reported physical interaction that took place with Thomas at the school. Cummins was added to Tennessee's top 10 most wanted list March 17. Anyone who provides information leading to his arrest will be eligible for a $1,000 reward. Beatriz Alvarado writes for the Corpus Christi (Texas) Caller-Times; Natalie Neysa Alund writes for The Tennessean. Contributing: Ariana Maia Sawyer, The Tennessean. Follow Beatriz Alvarado and Natalie Neysa Alund on Twitter: @CallerBetty and @nataliealund Related: Timeline shows troubling events before Elizabeth Thomas' disappearance

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
In their time to shine, conservative outlets find spotlight getting hot
Tomi Larhen, Andrew Napolitano and others face new scrutiny. And disciplinary actions.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
White House scoffs at CNN report on alleged Russian collusion
White House press secretary Sean Spicer mocked CNN on Thursday over its report that key figures in President Trump's campaign may have coordinated with Russian operatives to release damaging information about former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and influence the outcome of the 2016 campaign.Spicer recalled an incident in which former CNN analyst Donna Brazile was revealed by WikiLeaks to have provided...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Today in History: March 24


POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
4 people, including 2 children, found dead in California
Police found four people, including two children, dead Thursday in a California home and a suspect was in custody, officials said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Opinion: ‘There’s a Smell of Treason in the Air’
Did a traitor work with Russia to help Trump?

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
‘I immediately recognized him’: What we know about London attacker Khalid Masood
“They were just an ordinary family. I would never have assumed that he was in any way related to terrorist activity,” one former neighbor said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Wife rescued, husband still missing after canoe capsizes
Employees rescued a 73-year-old woman while her 66-year-old husband is still reported missing after the incident Wednesday

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Will Democrats Force Republicans to Go 'Nuclear' Over Gorsuch?
The battle over Trump's SCOTUS nominee has pushed one of Washington's most notorious phrases back into the spotlight: The so-called "nuclear option."

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Nunes regrets briefing Trump before intelligence panel
"Sometime you make the right decision, sometimes you don't," he said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Texas police chief arrested following chase, standoff
Deputies initially responded to Normangee Police Chief Charles Herford's home, where a dispatcher reported hearing gunshots during a call with Herford’s wife

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Analysis: Can President Trump Handle the Truth?
<p>President Donald Trump has brought to the Oval Office an entirely different set of assumptions about the proper behavior of a public official, and introduced to the country entirely new rules for public debate.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Coast Guard Suspends Search for Missing Cruise Ship Passenger
"Making the choice to suspend a search is never an easy decision and one the Coast Guard doesn't take lightly," the Coast Guard said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
State Dept. Orders Tougher Screening of Visa Applicants
The order, sent to all American embassies, would make it tougher for millions of visitors to enter the United States, marking the first sign of the president’s “extreme vetting.”

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Woman rescued after being stranded 5 days in Grand Canyon
Amber VanHecke, 24, took a wrong turn and ran out of gas.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
GOP criticized over lack of women in maternity coverage meeting
Massachusetts Rep. Jim McGovern (D) knocked House Republicans and Mike Pence on Thursday for holding a discussion on maternity care coverage in the GOP healthcare bill, without any women present. "This is outrageous: Not a single woman in the room as Mike Pence and House GOP propose removing maternity coverage in #Trumpcare," McGovern tweeted alongside a photo of the meeting. ...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
This state is about to get nation's toughest DUI law
Utah is moving toward adopting the nation’s strictest drunken-driving law under a measure to be signed by Gov. Gary Herbert. The legislation lowers the standard from the current 0.08 blood-alcohol content level — used nationwide — to 0.05 BAC. The drop means someone could be considered legally too drunk to drive after as little as a single strong drink, depending on their weight and tolerance. “We’re not asking for Prohibition,” Herbert said during a Thursday press conference. “We’re hoping people take this as a cautionary note.” The proposal has divided the tourist-dependent state, and Herbert said he’ll call a special legislative session later this summer to hash out additional details, including the exact implementation date. Some critics have urged Utah to delay rolling out the standard until other states act. Herbert hasn’t said when he’ll sign the law, which in its current form takes effect at the end of 2018. The National Transportation Safety Board backs the new Utah law and recommends all states adopt the 0.05 standard, if not lower, arguing that stricter laws could save more nearly 1,800 lives annually. About 10,000 people die in alcohol-related accidents on U.S. roads annually, the NTSB said. Utah was the first state to adopt the nation’s current .08 standard in 1983, and safety advocates say the Beehive State should once again lead by example. Herbert said 85% of the world’s population already lives under the .05 standard. Most of Europe, including France and Italy, along with Australia, New Zealand and Iceland, uses the .05 standard. Experts say the first signs of alcohol impairment manifest around that level of intoxication. Utah has a complicated history with alcohol: members of the Mormon Church, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, generally don’t consume alcohol, and the state has required non-Mormons to jump through logistical hoops if they want to drink alcohol in restaurants or bars. Some critics say the new law could make people think Utah is “weird,” something Herbert acknowledged he’s heard. Utah is 60% Mormon, and the church has a strong influence on the state’s politics and public life. “There’s not many Mormons in Rome, and they do this, too,” Herbert said. The Utah Restaurant Association opposes the change and plans to argue for revisions or delays in implementation. URA President Melva Sine said the new law imperils the state’s fast-growing economy. Liquor sales are usually a key profit maker for restaurants. “Our concern is that we’re going to criminalize people who are going out to enjoy an evening,” Sine said. “We feel like it will change the social structure of our entire state.” Herbert said people are free to drink as much as they want as long as they don’t get behind the wheel. But he acknowledged the concerns and said lawmakers would consider changes during the summer special session. Alcohol is significantly less of a factor in fatal crashes in Utah than excessive speed and lack of seat belt use, state highway officials report. Of the nearly 200 drivers tested for impairment following a fatal crash last year, 57% were completely sober, 9% had alcohol in their system, 30% had some sort of drug in their system, and 4% tested positive for both drugs and alcohol, the Highway Safety Office said. Acknowledging those statistics, Herbert said he wants to see lawmakers toughen penalties for distracted driving and increase enforcement of existing traffic safety laws.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Father of child Gorsuch ruled against urges senators not to confirm him
The father of an autistic student whom Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch ruled against urged senators on Thursday to oppose the judge's nomination. Jeffrey Perkins, whose son Luke was the subject of a unanimous 10th Circuit court decision...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Wisconsin shooting victims ID'd as cop, bank workers, lawyer
<p>Authorities on Thursday identified those killed in a series of northern Wisconsin shootings as two bank workers, a lawyer and a veteran police detective.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
GOP senator apologizes for mammogram joke
Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) is apologizing after brushing off a reporter's question about a rule mandating health insurers cover mammograms with a joke. "I deeply regret my comments on a very important topic. Mammograms are essential to women's health &amp; I never intended to indicate otherwise," Roberts wrote on Twitter on Thursday. I deeply regret my comments o...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
There’s a whole new species of cloud
Celebrate with some amazing photos of the fluffy stuff. Claudia Hinz | International Cloud Atlas The iridescence is caused by diffraction of sunlight in all the tiny, uniform clouds. Clouds are a lot like Baskin-Robbins. They’re timeless, can be found all over America, and come in 31 flavors. And induce nostalgia. Yes, there are 31 species of clouds—yes, they’re called species, just like plants and animals—in the new International Cloud Atlas. Bonus: there are also five new “supplementary features” recognized plus five “special clouds,” including the beautifully named flammagenitus, which sounds less like a localized collection of air moisture formed near wildfires and more like a wildly painful STD. And there’s a new accessory cloud, the flumen, which I can only assume is a small storage unit from Ikea (it’s actually a long, flat cloud associated with severe storms). But the pièce de résistance is the single new species: the volutus. Long, round, and rotating, in motion they look a bit like cloud hot dogs roasting on a spit. Only prettier. Amusing as cloud names are, categorizing them is serious business. The World Meteorological Organization, a subsection of the United Nations, has spent years collecting data from around the world to put together the newest edition of the Atlas. And it’s not just a fun resource to look at lots of pretty cloud pictures—it’s also a reference tool. They’ve basically compiled a massive database of every cloud type along with key information about each image, such that professional cloud observers (yes, that’s a real thing) have an up-to-date source to reference. It’s been published periodically since 1896, when it was an impressive feat just to have color photographs of the clouds, much less understand complex atmospheric science. Today we know far more about how clouds form and what weather they portend, so our classifications can be more complex. There are 10 overall types called genera, which are divided into different species—31 in all. Those 31 species can be further subdivided into several varieties, which describe the arrangement and visibility of the cloud parts. So in honor of the 21st-century Cloud Atlas, here are some beautiful cloud pictures (and also some actual information): Christy Gray | International Cloud Atlas Wakulla County, FL Volutus clouds are long, tube-shaped, and seem to rotate around the horizontal axis such that they look like they’re rolling. They’re the newly recognized species of cloud, but only occur in altocumulus and stratocumulus types (the ‘cumulus’ suffix means they’re both puffy). This stratocumulus volutus is unusual in that it has layers, much like ogres and onions, where normally it would be smooth and rounded. Michael C. Hanna | International Cloud Atlas Wayland, NY Besides the A+ fall foliage, this photographer managed to get all five species of cirrus cloud at once. All cirrus clouds are wispy, but some types are more wispy than others. Mostly what you’re seeing here are uncinus, especially right in the middle of the image. At the bottom right, where the clouds are longer and more straight, you can see the fibratus species. That floofy line just above the tree line in the center is a castellanus, and the last two species (floccus and spissatus) are the extra wispy bits dispersed throughout. Matthew Clark | International Cloud Atlas Burley in Wharfedale, West Yorkshire, United Kingdom Lenticularis or simply lenticular clouds, named for their lens-like shape, form when there’s stable, moist air currents that create rotating masses of air. The rotation makes for circular clouds and also for a lot of turbulence, which is why pilots often avoid them. It’s also possible that people have mistaken them for UFOs given their nice round shape, which would be especially understandable at twilight and under the influence of less-than-legal drugs. Stephen Burt | International Cloud Atlas Montreux, Switzerland Most of these clouds are cumulus congestus, which—much like a congested nose—have begun to drip with moisture. Cumulus clouds are those stereotypical dense, rounded towers that look a bit like cauliflower with dark, flat bottoms. If they keep growing vertically they can become cumulonimbus, which bring massive thunderstorms or even tornadoes. Joanne Kelly | International Cloud Atlas Great Harrowden, near Wellingborough, East Midlands, United Kingdom Stratocumulus clouds come in big sheets, with small undulations that make parts of it darker and gives the greyish-white blob some character. The individual waves in this sheet aren’t organized enough to be designated as undulatus, but they are opacus, since they block out the sun’s light. Mok Hing Yim | International Cloud Atlas Honolulu, Hawaii These altocumulus floccus clouds form little tufts throughout the sky. The trails behind them are actually falling ice crystals called virga, which will evaporate before they hit the ground and in the meantime look like little comma tails on the fluffy floccus puffs. Matthew Clark | International Cloud Atlas Campo, Colorado Tornadoes form when the swirling air under a cumulonimbus cloud reaches down to make contact with the earth below. This one is already brownish red from all the dust it’s picked up. Rita Ho | International Cloud Atlas Kowloon City, Hong Kong, China These are altocumulus stratiformis translucidus perlucidus undulatus, which basically translates to “high altitude sheet of thin, regularly spaced waves of cloud.” Fabrizio | International Cloud Atlas Pace del Mela, Italy This cumulonimbus capillatus has the classic anvil shape and dense bottom that you probably instinctively equate to a thunderstorm. And you’re right—they almost always produce intense weather like hail storms and lightning. George Anderson | International Cloud Atlas Wokingham, England, United Kingdom All of these clouds came from airplane activity. The more distinct trails—called contrails—are formed directly from flight paths, but that fluffy area in the middle formed as the contrails spread out and developed into a larger cloud. Irene Ho Pik Har | International Cloud Atlas Vancouver, Canada Flammagenitus clouds form above the rising hot air from fires. In this case, most of the “cloud” in this picture is actually smoke, but if you look up towards the top of the plume you can see a white, puffy formation—that’s the flammagenitus. Yoshiaki Sato | International Cloud Atlas Niagara Falls, NY, United States of America Plenty of water spray comes off of Niagara Falls, and sometimes that aerosolized water can condense into actual clouds, in this case stratus cataractagenitus, with a “spray bow” (a rainbow that forms from the spray of a waterfall) below. Javier Ceberio García | International Cloud Atlas Peñalara summit, Madrid, Spain From beneath this stratus cloud, it would be a gloomy day. From above, it’s bright and sunny. Hideyuki Oguri | International Cloud Atlas Russian Federation Wind moving across a large cloud like this can form Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, also called fluctus. For more amazing cloud pictures, head over to the International Cloud Atlas image gallery.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
State Dept. Orders Tougher Screening of Visa Applicants
The order, sent to all American embassies, would make it tougher for millions of visitors to enter the United States, marking the first sign of the president’s “extreme vetting.”

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
In their time to shine, conservative outlets find spotlight getting hot
Tomi Larhen, Andrew Napolitano and others face new scrutiny. And disciplinary actions.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
C.I.A. Developed Tools to Spy on Mac Computers, WikiLeaks Disclosure Shows
<p>The C.I.A. developed tools to spy on Mac computers by injecting software into the chips that control the computers’ fundamental operations, according to the latest cache of classified government documents published on Thursday by WikiLeaks.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Utah man killed in London attack was hit on bridge
<p>A Utah couple was enjoying the final day of their European trip to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary when they were among the crowd of people on London's Westminster Bridge who were struck by an SUV.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Here are some photos of Trump pretending to be a truck driver
<p>President Trump met with truckers and executives Thursday afternoon, taking a few minutes for a photo op inside a truck cab on the White House South Portico.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Black Lives Matter groups joining forces with wage activists
<p>A cluster of Black Lives Matter groups and the organization leading the push for a $15-an-hour wage are joining forces to combine the struggle for racial justice with the fight for economic equality, just as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. tried to do in the last year of his life.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Woman rescued after being stranded 5 days in Grand Canyon
Amber VanHecke, 24, took a wrong turn and ran out of gas.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Know rights, immigrant advocates are warning
Ever since President Donald Trump was elected, people have been asking Pablo Alvarado: If I get detained, you will protect me, right? You will help me so I don't get deported? The longtime immigrant rights organizer increasingly answers the questions of those in the U.S. illegally point-blank: Don't count on it. Get ready to fend for yourself. "People have to act," Alvarado said. "They have to take the bull by the horns." ...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Coast Guard Suspends Search for Missing Cruise Ship Passenger
"Making the choice to suspend a search is never an easy decision and one the Coast Guard doesn't take lightly," the Coast Guard said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
AP sources: US to approve Keystone XL pipeline
The Trump administration will approve the Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, senior U.S. officials said, ending years of delay for a project that has served as a flashpoint in the national debate about climate change.The State Department will recommend the pipeline is in U.S. interests, clearing the way for the White House to grant a presidential permit to TransCanada to build the $8 billion...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
A merciless bat-killing fungus is on the move again. Now it’s in Texas
The deadly fungus that causes white-nose syndrome has popped up in Texas. Now in 33 states, it's almost impossible to stop.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
This state is about to get nation's toughest DUI law
Utah is moving toward adopting the nation’s strictest drunken-driving law under a measure to be signed by Gov. Gary Herbert. The legislation lowers the standard from the current 0.08 blood-alcohol content level — used nationwide — to 0.05 BAC. The drop means someone could be considered legally too drunk to drive after as little as a single strong drink, depending on their weight and tolerance. “We’re not asking for Prohibition,” Herbert said during a Thursday press conference. “We’re hoping people take this as a cautionary note.” The proposal has divided the tourist-dependent state, and Herbert said he’ll call a special legislative session later this summer to hash out additional details, including the exact implementation date. Some critics have urged Utah to delay rolling out the standard until other states act. Herbert hasn’t said when he’ll sign the law, which in its current form takes effect at the end of 2018. The National Transportation Safety Board backs the new Utah law and recommends all states adopt the 0.05 standard, if not lower, arguing that stricter laws could save more nearly 1,800 lives annually. About 10,000 people die in alcohol-related accidents on U.S. roads annually, the NTSB said. Utah was the first state to adopt the nation’s current .08 standard in 1983, and safety advocates say the Beehive State should once again lead by example. Herbert said 85% of the world’s population already lives under the .05 standard. Most of Europe, including France and Italy, along with Australia, New Zealand and Iceland, uses the .05 standard. Experts say the first signs of alcohol impairment manifest around that level of intoxication. Utah has a complicated history with alcohol: members of the Mormon Church, also known as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, generally don’t consume alcohol, and the state has required non-Mormons to jump through logistical hoops if they want to drink alcohol in restaurants or bars. Some critics say the new law could make people think Utah is “weird,” something Herbert acknowledged he’s heard. Utah is 60% Mormon, and the church has a strong influence on the state’s politics and public life. “There’s not many Mormons in Rome, and they do this, too,” Herbert said. The Utah Restaurant Association opposes the change and plans to argue for revisions or delays in implementation. URA President Melva Sine said the new law imperils the state’s fast-growing economy. Liquor sales are usually a key profit maker for restaurants. “Our concern is that we’re going to criminalize people who are going out to enjoy an evening,” Sine said. “We feel like it will change the social structure of our entire state.” Herbert said people are free to drink as much as they want as long as they don’t get behind the wheel. But he acknowledged the concerns and said lawmakers would consider changes during the summer special session. Alcohol is significantly less of a factor in fatal crashes in Utah than excessive speed and lack of seat belt use, state highway officials report. Of the nearly 200 drivers tested for impairment following a fatal crash last year, 57% were completely sober, 9% had alcohol in their system, 30% had some sort of drug in their system, and 4% tested positive for both drugs and alcohol, the Highway Safety Office said. Acknowledging those statistics, Herbert said he wants to see lawmakers toughen penalties for distracted driving and increase enforcement of existing traffic safety laws.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Rick Perry Slams Student Government Election as 'Diversity' Stunt
In an op-ed, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry suggested Texas A&amp;M's student body election process was rigged in the name of diversity.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Border Patrol union takes center stage under Trump
Once a week, union leaders representing U.S. Border Patrol agents host a radio show from a sleepy office park near San Diego, where studio walls are covered with an 8-by-12-foot American flag and portraits of President Donald Trump and Vice...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Wife rescued, husband still missing after canoe capsizes
Employees rescued a 73-year-old woman while her 66-year-old husband is still reported missing after the incident Wednesday

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
WikiLeaks publishes CIA hacking tactics for Apple products
WikiLeaks Thursday released a cache of new documents from their CIA leak, outlining how the agency attacked Apple products.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Man Fatally Stabbed in Random Attack Had Loved Manhattan, Relative Says
A cousin said Timothy Caughman attended college, helped young people and enjoyed the library and shopping.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
The State Dept. Rewrote Its Climate Change Page
Within a day of Rex Tillerson’s swearing in as secretary of state, the State Department’s climate change website began to change. The changes signal a shift away from leading international climate actions that the Obama administration pursued and a pivot toward a more passive role. The Environmental Data Governance Initiative tracked the changes to the Office of Global Change web page and shared them with Climate Central. They are the first changes to the State Department site documented by EDGI after Tillerson took over on Feb. 1, according to Toly Rinberg, a researcher at EDGI who caught the change. Changes were made to the State Department's Office of Global Change web page shortly after Rex Tillerson was sworn in. The image on the left shows it in its Obama-era format. Click images to enlarge. Credit: EDGI Nearly the entire description of the office was changed. Deleted from the text was: “The United States is taking a leading role by advancing an ever-expanding suite of measures at home and abroad.” Also stricken were references to mitigation efforts and other mentions of leading on climate change. In its place is more generic language, solely referencing that the office represents the U.S. at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and other international forums. It does use the word “lead” once, but only saying the office leads the U.S. government in participating with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The new language does note foreign assistance for clean energy and adaptation. The addition of adaptation language mirrors changes to the Environmental Protection Agency’s website. Other changes to the page that occurred prior to Tillerson’s swearing in include paring down the sidebar menu that had links to reports and statements about climate change that included how the U.S. was addressing its international climate commitments. On their own, they are small changes and are to be expected with any new administration. But they didn’t happen in a vacuum and taken with other actions, they offer insights into America’s climate change strategy abroad. The G20 finance ministers recently axed climate finance from a communique under U.S. pressure, a move that business leaders promptly decried. That stands in contrast to the 2016 communique, when G20 finance ministers lauded the Paris Agreement and pledged to provide assistance to developing countries for clean energy and adaptation projects through mechanisms such as the Green Climate Fund, which aims to raise $100 billion by 2020. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson at a meeting in Japan. Credit: Frank Robichon/Reuters President Trump’s 2018 budget proposal also represents a major departure from recent years. The blueprint slices more than $10 billion off the current State Department budget, including zeroing out U.S. commitments to the international climate process and funding. That’s in addition to cuts into clean energy innovation and domestic climate programs (though the final budget passed through Congress will likely look different). In a letter to State Department staff, Tillerson endorsed shrinking the budget. “It acknowledges that U.S. engagement must be more efficient, that our aid be more effective, and that advocating the national interests of our country always be our primary mission,” Tillerson wrote, according to the Washington Post. “Additionally, the budget is an acknowledgment that development needs are a global challenge to be met not just by contributions from the United States, but through greater partnership with and contributions from our allies and others.” What happens to the Paris Agreement itself will be perhaps the strongest signal of how the U.S. approaches climate change on the international stage. Reports indicate that presidential advisor Steve Bannon and the more populist faction of Trump’s inner circle want the U.S. to exit the agreement, which Trump said he would “cancel” during the campaign. Another faction of the White House is in favor of staying in the Paris Agreement, of which Tillerson is likely a part. During his testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, he said “I think we're better served by being at that table than leaving that table,” though he also puts the brakes on a bit by noting “as we commit to those accords, are there any elements of that that put America to a disadvantage?” Any changes to how the U.S. acts — or doesn’t act — on climate change come at a crucial time for the world. The planet just endured its third straight year of record-setting heat, and 16 of the 17 hottest years have all occurred since 2000. While renewable energy investments are at an all-time high, there’s still a vast amount of work the world will need to do to shift away from fossil fuels and avoid the worst impacts of climate change. What role the U.S. plays in that remains to be seen.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
In a do-or-die moment, Republicans come undone
The promise to repeal Obamacare was easy. Producing a bill to make good on the promise remains elusive.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Trump delivers ultimatum to House Republicans: Pass health-care measure on Friday or he’ll move on
<p>President Trump delivered an ultimatum to House Republicans on Thursday night: Vote to approve the measure to overhaul the nation’s health-care system on the House floor Friday, or reject it.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
A Brave Front, but Regrets? On Health Bill, Trump Has a Few
Even as the president has maintained bravado in public, people close to him say he is grappling with bouts of self-doubt as his hopes for a quick health care victory unravel.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Will Democrats Force Republicans to Go 'Nuclear' Over Gorsuch?
The battle over Trump's SCOTUS nominee has pushed one of Washington's most notorious phrases back into the spotlight: The so-called "nuclear option."

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
New CBO score for health plan: smaller deficit cut, same uninsured
<p>The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) on Thursday released a new score for the revised plan to repeal and replace ObamaCare that Republican leaders are struggling to pass through the House.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Analysis: Can President Trump Handle the Truth?
<p>President Donald Trump has brought to the Oval Office an entirely different set of assumptions about the proper behavior of a public official, and introduced to the country entirely new rules for public debate.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
State Dept. Orders Tougher Screening of Visa Applicants
The order, sent to all American embassies, would make it tougher for millions of visitors to enter the United States, marking the first sign of the president’s “extreme vetting.”

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
8 things we won’t know about the AHCA until after the House votes on it
Huge questions remain unanswered as House Republicans vote to reshape 1/6th of the economy. Apparently, the House of Representatives is voting on the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the first part of the Republican strategy to “repeal and replace” Obamacare, on Friday afternoon before the Congressional Budget Office has scored a final version — actually, before there is a final version.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
GOP criticized over lack of women in maternity coverage meeting
Massachusetts Rep. Jim McGovern (D) knocked House Republicans and Mike Pence on Thursday for holding a discussion on maternity care coverage in the GOP healthcare bill, without any women present. "This is outrageous: Not a single woman in the room as Mike Pence and House GOP propose removing maternity coverage in #Trumpcare," McGovern tweeted alongside a photo of the meeting. ...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Senate Votes to Let ISPs Sell Your Data Without Consent
The measure, which the only Democratic member of the FCC said opens 'a massive gap in consumer protection law,' still has to pass the House and be signed by the president.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Trump preparing orders to review trade deals, procurement: officials
<p>The Trump administration is preparing new executive orders to re-examine all 14 U.S. free trade agreements and review government procurement policies to aid American companies, two administration officials said.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
The Hill’s Whip List: Where Dems stand on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee
After four long days of questions and testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Democrats are beginning to announce where they stand on Judge Neil Gorsuch's nomination to the Supreme Court.With leaders eyeing a final confirmation vote in early April, Republicans must gather 60 votes or consider changing the Senate's filibuste...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
The fight over 'essential health benefits,' explained
The provision requires insurers to cover the basics like prescriptions and hospitalization. Republicans want to get rid of it. Remember all that talk during the health reform debate about why men should have to pay for maternity care? What politicians were really arguing about was the “essential health benefits” provision in Obamacare.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Trump picks Tenn. businessman for ambassador to Japan
Trump's expected nominee Bill Hagerty had experience in the public and private sectors.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Appeals court sets hearing on travel ban
The federal appeals court in Richmond, Va., Thursday agreed to move quickly in hearing the government's appeal of a lower court order that blocked President Trump's revised travel ban. The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals set the hearing for 1 p.m. on May 8.District judges in Hawaii and Maryland issued separate orders earlier this mon...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Senators introduce new Iran sanctions
The legislation would impose new ballistic missile and terrorism-related sanctions.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Q&A: Disclosure of inadvertent spying on Trump team stokes confusion
WASHINGTON _ The disclosure by California Republican Rep. Devin Nunes, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, that communications by Trump transition members were inadvertently picked up by U.S. surveillance legally collecting foreign intelligence raises questions that are likely to consume Congress and the White House for months. Among them: Q: Who in the Trump transition team was captured by the...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Democrats threaten delay on Supreme Court nominee
Senate Democrats vowed Thursday to impede Judge Neil Gorsuch's path to the Supreme Court, setting up a political showdown with implications for future openings on the high court. Still irate that Republicans blocked President Barack Obama's nominee, Democrats consider Gorsuch a threat to a wide range of civil rights and think...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Nicholas Kristof: ‘There’s a Smell of Treason in the Air’
Did a traitor work with Russia to help Trump?

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
The News in Cartoons
<p>See the news through the eyes of cartoonists</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Hannity: The legislative branch has failed the president
It's time to start working with a sense of urgency to fix the mess you are making

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
'Trumpcare' Is a Women's Health Disaster
The American Health Care Act and its witless tune-ups make it seem as though nobody has thought any of this through past the photo op.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
GOP chief: Obamacare is broken, and Republicans can fix it
When President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act seven years ago, he saddled Americans with a healthcare system that put the ultra-liberal agenda ahead of our best interests. We were promised that Obamacare would bring down healthcare costs with increased competition between insurance providers. We were promised we could keep our healthcare plans. We were promised that Obamacare would not raise middle class taxes. Instead, the law brought the American people rising premiums, unaffordable deductibles, fewer insurance choices and higher taxes. We were let down. Then, in 2014, Nancy Pelosi sought to defend the collapsing law by claiming its success should be measured by the number of people who had access to affordable healthcare and its ability to lower skyrocketing costs. By Pelosi’s own standards, Obamacare has been an unmitigated failure. This year alone, Obamacare premiums have gone up by an average of 25%, and in some places have risen by over 100%. Individuals have insurance that they cannot afford — high deductibles distort the meaning of coverage. Under the two most popular Obamacare health plans, thousands of families have been forced to shoulder burdensome deductibles equivalent to 10% and 6% of the median American household income. This is not affordable. Obama’s promise of “choice” has turned out to be fiction for people living in more than 1,000 counties who are left with one insurance provider on their state exchanges. No one can deny Obamacare is in a ‘death spiral’ when the number of Americans with only one insurer from which to choose jumps from 2% to 17% in one year. This is not choice. POLICING THE USA: A look at race, justice, media Our families can no longer afford to support an expensive, unsustainable healthcare system, but for years Democrats ignored the warnings that Obamacare would increase the deficit. It was clear Democrats realized opposition to the healthcare law was growing when they wasted tens of millions of taxpayer dollars last year alone in an attempt to rescue Obamacare’s plummeting popularity. Even still, they refuse to acknowledge the legislation is hurting the very people they claimed to help. Unlike the Democrats, Republicans and Trump are listening to the American people and promised to repeal and replace this disaster. They have worked together to introduce legislation in Congress that ensures Americans with pre-existing conditions have access to coverage, and that we have a stable transition for Americans currently enrolled in the healthcare exchanges. Republican-led reforms would help Americans purchase their own coverage through the use of tax credits and expanded health savings accounts, so that they can get a plan that works for them, not a one-size-fits-all plan forced on them by the government. Our families would have the freedom to purchase health insurance across state lines, creating a truly competitive national marketplace that will drastically reduce costs and provide far better care. Even the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office projects this new healthcare legislation would cut our federal deficit by $337 billion. While Obamacare drove up premiums, the Republican-led healthcare reforms would lower premiums by 10%. Obamacare forced small business layoffs, but the repeal and replace bill would lower taxes by $883 billion. These are real reforms that our country needs, and stands in sharp contrast to the out of control spending Obamacare inflicted on our economy. Though this new legislation would benefit those they represent, Democrats are digging in their heels in the name of partisanship and preserving Obama’s failed legacy. Thanks to a unified Republican government, I am confident that Republicans in Congress will deliver on their promises to the American people and bring positive change to our broken healthcare system. Ronna McDaniel is chair of the RNC. Follow her on Twitter @RRMGOP You can read diverse opinions from our Board of Contributors and other writers on the Opinion front page, on Twitter @USATOpinion and in our daily Opinion newsletter. To respond to a column, submit a comment to letters@usatoday.com.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Joe Kennedy III: Trump-Ryan Health Care Bill Is an Act of Malice
The GOP's health care bill would wreak havoc on patients, families and caregivers.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
GOP health care plan could force disabled back into institutions
Much of the back and forth over the House GOP’s proposed American Health Care Act has focused on the number of people likely to lose coverage because of the legislation. That’s understandable, given that the Congressional Budget Office predicts 24 million fewer people will be insured as a result of AHCA. Yet for millions of people with disabilities receiving Medicaid-funded home care, the House legislation means something worse than loss of coverage: loss of freedom. Many people with disabilities already had access to Medicaid prior to the Affordable Care Act, due to automatic Medicaid eligibility available for those receiving Supplemental Security Income, one of the two major programs that provide income to non-veterans with disabilities. For this population, the greatest threat AHCA poses comes in the form of Medicaid per capita caps, a major shift in the traditional state-federal partnership that has defined the Medicaid program for half a century. For the past 50 years, the main goal of disability rights activists has been to help people with disabilities transition out of institutional settings and into their own homes and communities. To accomplish this, advocates and policymakers have worked to establish an extensive system of support services for seniors, non-elderly adults, and children with disabilities; rather than pushing people into segregated settings, the support now comes to them, in their homes. Between 1960 and 2013, as a result of this effort, states closed 219 state institutions for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Whereas in 1977 the average person with a developmental disability lived in a place that housed 22.5 people, by 2011 that number had dropped to 2.3, reflecting a vast shift toward integration and personalization of services. All this progress has taken place under the umbrella of the Medicaid program, the primary payer for both institutional and community-based care — with a nudge from the Americans With Disabilities Act. Today, approximately 3 million people with disabilities receive home- and community-based services from Medicaid. But now, progress on deinstitutionalization, and support for disabled Americans in general, is at profound risk under the AHCA’s Medicaid cuts, which the CBO calculates will total $880 billion over 10 years. (Earlier today, a group of disability rights activists were arrested in the Capitol Rotunda while protesting that per capita caps would cut the services that keep them and other disabled people out of nursing homes and institutions.) Under current law, each state receives a federal match that covers a set percentage of the state’s Medicaid costs, a figure calculated based on the state’s poverty levels relative to the rest of the country. This means that states are reimbursed based on their actual Medicaid costs, which allows them to experiment by investing in new types of services or respond quickly to changing demographics or public health emergencies. Under AHCA’s per capita cap proposal — explained in more detail by Vox’s Dylan Matthews — states would have federal funding limited to a certain level, calculated by the number of people a state has enrolled from each of Medicaid’s five population groups: seniors, people with disabilities, children, adults enrolled via Medicaid expansion, and adults enrolled through other policies. AHCA assigns each of these groups a state-by-state “cap” — determined by each state’s historical funding patterns as of 2016. The AHCA funding formula then determines a total cap on state federal funding — one that can only grow with medical inflation. Under per capita caps, states could no longer receive additional federal funds to support a sudden emergency, unmet need, or increase in the cost of care. And since the index of medical inflation used by AHCA grows slower than projected actual Medicaid cost growth, every year states would receive a cut relative to the funding they would be eligible for under current law. People with disabilities do better getting services at home — but Medicaid is biased in favor of institutions. As a result, home care is vulnerable to Medicaid cuts. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Medicaid home- and community-based services as a percentage of total Medicaid long-term service and support, FY 1995 to 2014. While seniors and people with disabilities represent a minority of Medicaid enrollees, they make up the majority of Medicaid costs; about a third of Medicaid expenditures go toward disability and aging services. For Americans with disabilities, the ability to live outside of a nursing home or institution is not just a distinction between two somewhat different kinds of service: It’s a civil rights issue. Institutional life is often regimented, tightly controlled, and very limiting. People living in an institution may be denied basic choices, including when to go to sleep, what to eat, and whom they may talk to (and when). National Core Indicators Project It is not only rights that suffer in institutions — life skills deteriorate, too. Evidence suggests that exit into the community can actually improve the functional skills of many people with disabilities. The research shows that in domains like self-care, “community living skills,” communications, and social interaction, people have better outcomes after leaving institutions. In part due to these findings, the Supreme Court ruled in its 1999 Olmstead v. L.C. decision that the Americans With Disabilities Act required state Medicaid programs to offer community-based options as an alternative to anyone who wished to take advantage of them. National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and Association of University Centers on Disability The decision was a landmark for the disabilities rights movement, but the rights it granted were not absolute: The decision of whether someone receiving state aid got the chance to live in the broader community had to be weighed “in view of the resources available to the state,” as the Court put it. (On average, and in the specific cases of the two women who inspired the Olmstead suit, it was actually less expensive to provide community-based services — although that is not always the case.) Thus, a significant loss of federal Medicaid funds would lead to a reduction in access to in-home supports. Were a state to be sued under Olmstead for keeping disabled citizens in institutions, it might find it much easier, in a post-AHCA world, to make the case that doing so was a financial necessity, given the Medicaid cuts. Unfortunately, while Medicaid can pay for in-home care, the program is in many ways still biased toward institutional settings. That’s because nursing homes and other institutional settings are treated as entitlements in state Medicaid programs; anyone who qualifies must get in, somewhere. In contrast, states can cap enrollment for in-home supports, and run waiting lists. (It can take years to get off a waiting list and access community-based supports.) As of fiscal year 2015, there were 640,841 people waiting for home- and community-based supports, most of whom are people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Since institutional coverage is mandatory while community-based support is dependent on availability of state dollars, any cuts made to Medicaid fall disproportionately on in-home care. Those $880 billion in Medicaid cuts put such services at profound risk. Republicans know this makes them politically vulnerable — and are trying to blame Obamacare for a problem they’re making worse. Republicans realize that this is one of their greatest political vulnerabilities in the health care discussion. Many who are perfectly content to kick low-income Americans off coverage resist the idea of taking services from children and adults with disabilities. Leaked documents from the Republican Governors Association suggest that GOP governors fear cuts to this population too, recognizing the heavy cost burden that a loss of federal support will place on states. Since such services have no corollary in private insurance, officials can’t pretend that those kicked out of Medicaid services will get them covered elsewhere — and with in-home care costing tens of thousands of dollars on average, paying out of pocket isn’t an option. A bogus conservative claim: the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion came at the cost of people with disabilities Starting shortly after the election, some members of the conservative media broached a new and particularly disingenuous line of attack against the Affordable Care Act: They claimed that by incentivizing states to expand Medicaid for working-age adults, the law had diverted funds away from people with disabilities, making waiting lists for community care longer. This talking point was recently picked up by prominent House Republicans, including Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who published a blog post about a child with a disability in Arkansas waiting for services. But waiting lists long predate the ACA. What’s more, most states that have expanded Medicaid either have no waiting list or have reduced the size of their list since expansion. In contrast, the majority of non-expansion states have increased the size of their waiting lists — with almost half of those waiting for services in Texas and Florida, two non-expansion states. In fact, in 2014-’15 the average increase in the waiting list for in-home care was more than 2.5 times greater in non-expansion states than in expansion ones. That’s a predictable result, given that states that chose to expand were more likely to be more generous to begin with in funding their Medicaid programs. Contrary to McCarthy’s statement, Medicaid expansion hasn’t made the waiting list problem worse. In fact, it has been of tremendous benefit for people with disabilities who can’t get on Supplemental Security Income and can now access Medicaid solely based on their low-income status. This is a particularly big problem for autistic adults, people with psychiatric disabilities, and many individuals struggling with substance abuse disorders, all of whom often struggle to get on SSI. (For some, this is because they earn slightly too much money — at jobs that don’t offer health benefits. For others, it’s just too difficult to navigate the complex Social Security Administration bureaucracy.) This is why — far from buying into the idea that Medicaid expansion is “stealing” money from those on waiting lists — disability advocates strongly oppose rolling back Medicaid expansion. A considerable percentage of those benefiting from Medicaid expansion are people with disabilities, making the accusations of “theft” from disabled people all the more odious. As recently as Monday night, last-minute changes to the American Health Care Act attempted to alleviate concerns from states by slightly tweaking the growth rate for the caps the legislation imposes on costs from seniors and people with disabilities. This too is a recognition that the legislation’s Medicaid cuts put disability and aging services at grave risk. Yet since the plan’s cap on federal Medicaid funding applies to a state as a whole rather than any specific population within it, this change fails to address the problem. AHCA’s per capita cap system explicitly allows a state to apply cuts made to one population toward another; in other words, AHCA’s tweak to the funding formula improves the growth in the state’s Medicaid funding cap as a whole, with no guarantee that those services will actually serve disabled adults. And relative to current law, AHCA’s Medicaid cuts are so sizable that they will still almost surely force states to make cutbacks in in-home care programs. If Republicans wanted to fix the waiting list problem, they could simply change Medicaid law to require states to cover in-home care on an equal basis with institutionalization. They have declined to do so. In fact, the House bill does more than make broad-based Medicaid cuts — it also eliminates, by 2020, a part of the ACA specifically designed to help states end waiting lists for community-based care: the Community First Choice State Plan Option. That program gives states a 6 percent bump in federal matching dollars to pay for in-home attendants for disabled people — if the states eliminate their waiting lists. Eight states have taken that offer, including deep red states like Texas and Montana. According to initial data on the first four states to roll out the program, the Community First Choice State Plan Option is already serving well over a half million people — yet the House bill being voted on this week sunsets funding for the program, cutting about $12 billion in funding for in-home care over the next decade. The Community First Choice State Option was itself inserted into the Affordable Care Act as a compromise. It reflected the political reality that making in-home care a mandatory service under Medicaid law was not feasible at the time. I was one of the advocates who sat with the Obama administration’s Nancy-Ann DeParle, making the case for this provision as a second-best way to free thousands of people from institutional life. The willingness of AHCA’s drafters to eliminate this program makes a mockery of the already ridiculous claims that they are “saving” people with disabilities from Obamacare. After an election season in which disability had more visibility than ever before, lawmakers know that attacking this population makes no sense in either political or policy terms. Despite the empty Republican rhetoric about “saving” disabled people from Obamacare, the AHCA’s Medicaid cuts put people with disabilities at profound risk, threatening to turn the clock back decades to a time when in-home care was rare. For people with disabilities, such a step back threatens lives — as well as the most basic of freedoms. Ari Ne’eman is the CEO of MySupport.com , an online platform helping people with disabilities, seniors, and families to manage their in-home services. From 2006 to 2016 he served as president of the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and from 2010 to 2015 he was one of President Obama’s appointees to the National Council on Disability. Find him on Twitter @aneeman . The Big Idea is Vox’s home for smart, often scholarly discussion of the most important issues and ideas in politics, science, and culture — typically written by outside contributors. If you have an idea for a piece, pitch us at thebigidea@vox.com

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Ann Coulter: We Have No Hit Full-On Crazy
Liberals think every single Third-Worlder is entitled to live within our borders.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Supreme Court Just Gutted a Gorsuch Opinion — and Made Him Look Extreme
In the midst of the nominee’s confirmation hearing, SCOTUS makes him look more conservative than Clarence Thomas on education rights.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Democrats' Gorsuch attacks undermine the law
Smart people often say stupid things. #MistakesHappen. But it takes a certain special orientation to repeat obviously false and ridiculous statements over and over. That’s a talent peculiar to politicians. This talent is frequently on display during Supreme Court confirmation fights. Since the 1970s, every nominee from a Republican president has been attacked, among other things, as hostile to women’s rights and civil rights. That includes Harry Blackmun, John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day O’Connor, Anthony Kennedy and David Souter — justices who often have been as zealous as any in finding, creating and expanding rights for women and minorities. Constantly being wrong, however, doesn’t prevent the same trope being trotted out as soon as the next nominee is announced. Opening statements from Democratic senators during the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Judge Neil Gorsuch didn’t disappoint in absurdly trying to paint the nominee as a tool of corporate America and an enemy of “the little guy.” Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, wasted no time in lashing out before Gorsuch had a chance to utter a single word: “A pattern jumps out at me. ... You consistently choose corporations and powerful interests over people.” Likewise, Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., weighed in with more of the same: “I fear confirming you would guarantee more ... decisions that continue to favor powerful corporate interests over the rights of average Americans.” A newer attack line for liberal critics is that a judicial nominee favors big interests, employers, people with money — anyone in conflict with the little guy. Sen. Ted Kennedy, scion of wealth and privilege, used that line against nominee Sam Alito, a man whose background, family and experience gave him ample affinity with ordinary life and people. Kennedy’s successor, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, has reached for the same trick in attacking Gorsuch. She claims he “has sided with employers who deny wages,” “sided with employers who denied retirement benefits to their workers,” and “sided with big insurance companies against disabled workers.” Despite the cartoon-version descriptions of a judge who "has sided" with the wrong people, the judge’s job isn’t to choose David vs. Goliath, to stand up for the little guy, to smack down the big guy. The way little guys get protected isn’t to have a judge who votes on his or her gut sympathies. Instead, it’s to have a legal system that functions according to rules, legitimately enacted by constitutionally appropriate bodies and procedures, enforced in principled, predictable ways by judges who read the law carefully and apply it as written, no matter what the judge feels about the people on either side of the case. Despots want judges who make decisions based on who is helped or hurt. Making decisions on the basis of principles, fixed in law and knowable in advance, is the exact opposite — and the essence of the rule of law. As Justice Antonin Scalia often said, a judge who’s always happy with who wins and loses is doing something wrong. Beyond having the wrong goal for judging, there’s a bit of flimflam in Warren’s attack. Of course, among the thousands of cases Gorsuch has voted on, he inevitably has decided for employers, and against them; for corporations, and against them; for insurance companies, and against them. But he hasn’t decided consistently or inappropriately for or against anyone, any group, or any class. POLICING THE USA: A look at race, justice, media That’s evident in the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary voting Gorsuch a unanimous well-qualified rating, its highest. Having served on that body, I can attest that its members take their task seriously and look critically at every possible issue that could affect a judge’s qualifications. Any hint of impropriety would be inconsistent with the top rating. The “wrong side” argument also mistakenly assumes that a rule that helps one group necessarily hurts another, big guys or little guys. That is completely wrong. For instance, adherence to fixed, clear rules on contracts helps rich investors such as Warren Buffett — and also helps poor investors whose life savings go into the same sort of funds. Constant, unsubstantiated and ill-considered assertions of judicial misbehavior have become part of the standard attack on nominees. But the claim that Gorsuch has sided with the wrong sort of litigant is so patently misguided, so obviously wrong and so at odds with the essence of the rule of law, that even aspiring political stars should consider taking it out of the arsenal. Ronald A. Cass, dean emeritus of Boston University School of Law, is president of Cass &amp; Associates and author of The Rule of Law in America . He is also a former chairman of the Federalist Society's Practice Group on International Law &amp; National Security. You can read diverse opinions from our Board of Contributors and other writers on the Opinion front page, on Twitter @USATOpinion and in our daily Opinion newsletter. To submit a letter, comment or column, check our submission guidelines .

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Republicans' cruel intentions
When he began running for president in 1999, George W. Bush presented himself as "a different kind of Republican," to quote the phrase that seemed to come up in every profile written about him at the time. He was deeply conservative, yes, but he was also happy to interact with non-white people. He advocated something called "compassionate conservatism," which, though it meant little in practice, did communicate a gentle and caring heart. He even criticized ...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Days before his death, Putin critic said he knew he was in danger
The Kremlin denied any links to the slaying of Russian Denis Voronenkov, a former lawmaker, in Kiev.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
China is not militarizing South China Sea, Premier Li says
China is not militarizing the South China Sea, Premier Li Keqiang said on Friday, although he acknowledged that defense equipment on islands in the disputed waterway had been placed there to maintain "freedom of navigation".

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Officials: N. Korea will launch another nuke test in next few days
North Korea is in the final stages of preparing for another nuclear test, which could come in the next few days, U.S. officials with knowledge of the most recent intelligence from the region told Fox News.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
London defiant as IS claims attack by British ex-con
The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for an attack by a man who plowed an SUV into pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer to death on the grounds of Parliament, and the investigation shifted Thursday to a city in central England long known as an incubator for radicalism.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Washington talks end without agreement on Israeli settlements
The Trump administration reiterated its concerns about Israeli settlement activity, the two sides said on Thursday, as a round of talks ended without agreement over limiting future construction on land the Palestinians want for a state.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Today in History: March 24


POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
‘I immediately recognized him’: What we know about London attacker Khalid Masood
“They were just an ordinary family. I would never have assumed that he was in any way related to terrorist activity,” one former neighbor said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Germany's Merkel does not expect more EU departures after Brexit
Chancellor Angela Merkel does not fear that more countries will leave the European Union, she told a German newspaper as the bloc's leaders prepare to celebrate 60 years of union on Saturday days before Britain files for divorce.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Erdogan: I'll keep up 'Nazi' taunts if I'm called 'dictator'
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Thursday he will keep up his 'Nazi" taunts targeting European leaders as long as they keep on calling him a "dictator".

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
U.S. warns South Sudan against 'deliberate starvation tactics'
<p>The United States warned South Sudan's government on Thursday that preventing humanitarian aid workers from reaching parts of the war-torn state that are suffering famine could "amount to deliberate starvation tactics."</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
UAE says it's surprised by laptop ban but will cooperate
The United Arab Emirates, one of the world's top aviation hubs, has said it was surprised by the ban on laptops in plane cabins bound for the United States because UAE security was already tight, but it pledged to cooperate with U.S. authorities.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Wisconsin shooting victims ID'd as cop, bank workers, lawyer
<p>Authorities on Thursday identified those killed in a series of northern Wisconsin shootings as two bank workers, a lawyer and a veteran police detective.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Stolen Super Bowl jerseys returned to Patriots by FBI
Investigators showed up at Gillette Stadium with the recovered jerseys, even stopping to pose for a photo with them.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Parents accused in kid's shooting death investigated in 2014
<p>Child-welfare officials investigated an Arizona couple accused of murder in their 9-year-old son's shooting death after she gave birth to a child who had been exposed to methadone and heroin.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Man wanted in Tenn. teen's disappearance may be in Texas
A man wanted in connection to the disappearance of a Tennessee teen may have been spotted in Texas, authorities there confirmed Thursday afternoon. Corpus Christi police spokeswoman Gena Pena said police were dispatched about 1 p.m. CT to North Beach after a call from Tennessee was forwarded to the police department. North Beach is home to the Texas State Aquarium and the Lexington, an aircraft carrier turned museum. Depending on the route traveled, North Beach could be up to 1,000 miles southwest of Columbia, Tenn., Elizabeth Thomas' hometown. Thomas, 15, was last seen March 13 wearing a flannel shirt and black leggings. The girl's 50-year-old high school teacher Tad Cummins is accused of kidnapping her. Related: Man searched 'teen marriage' before kidnapping Police in Corpus Christi went to the area after a call indicated an SUV with a partially-matched license plate may have been seen. "Units are out there trying to look for the vehicle but nothing has been found," said Pena. Authorities have been looking for a silver Nissan Rogue with Tennessee license plate 976ZPT. Earlier Thursday, the family of a missing Tennessee girl called the last 10 days the most difficult in their lives in a letter that asked for continued prayers. "The family has been overwhelmed with the kindness shown to us by the Maury County (Tenn.) community and beyond," the single-page letter released through attorney S. Jason Whatley reads. "We humbly ask that you continue to pray as we do our best to cope with the emotional weight of Elizabeth's abduction." An AMBER Alert for Thomas was issued March 14. The family's letter continued: "We are desperate for any information that might lead to our daughter. The information that we need is not only from what people have seen and heard after Elizabeth's disappearance, but also from before. Facts about prior events, especially interaction between Elizabeth and Tad Cummins and statements made by both parties to third parties, may very well contain clues to lead to Elizabeth's return... Elizabeth must be found. Time is of the essence." A warrant was issued for Cummins' arrest after the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation suggested he "may have been abusing his role as a teacher to groom this vulnerable young girl for some time in an effort to lure and potentially sexually exploit her." Related: Tenn. authorities searching for missing teen, teacher accused of kidnapping her Cummins taught at Culleoka Unit School, where Thomas was a student, until he was dismissed March 14. He was initially suspended when the Maury County Sheriff's Department began investigating him for sexual contact with a minor. District Attorney General Brent Cooper said Cummins will be charged with the aggravated kidnapping of Thomas, in addition to charges he faces for a reported physical interaction that took place with Thomas at the school. Cummins was added to Tennessee's top 10 most wanted list March 17. Anyone who provides information leading to his arrest will be eligible for a $1,000 reward. Beatriz Alvarado writes for the Corpus Christi (Texas) Caller-Times; Natalie Neysa Alund writes for The Tennessean. Contributing: Ariana Maia Sawyer, The Tennessean. Follow Beatriz Alvarado and Natalie Neysa Alund on Twitter: @CallerBetty and @nataliealund Related: Timeline shows troubling events before Elizabeth Thomas' disappearance

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
4 people, including 2 children, found dead in California
Police found four people, including two children, dead Thursday in a California home and a suspect was in custody, officials said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Death on a Prison Bus as Safety Improvements Lag
Federal officials promised last year to look into the mistreatment of detainees, some held for minor offenses, on buses operated by for-profit companies. Little has changed.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Police: Repeatedly deported MS-13 gang member abused child
<p>A member of the MS-13 street gang who had been deported from the U.S. four times stabbed two women and sexually assaulted a 2-year-old girl in a New York City suburb, police said Thursday.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
In a Miami twist, a taxi driver beats, robs passenger of $800
<p>Miami-Dade police are searching for a taxi driver who allegedly mugged a tourist.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Police: Mom beat, choked girl over incorrect Bible verses
A woman severely beat her daughter, tried to strangle her and kicked her out of their house for incorrectly reciting Bible verses, police say.Rhonda Kemp Shoffner's daughter, who is under the age of 13, was forced to kneel on the bathroom floor at their Middletown home and repeat Bible verses, police told Pennlive.com. The girl told police her mother had been drunk for three days.Shoffner, police say,...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
3 dead, officer wounded and police dog killed in La. shooting
Authorities say three people and a police dog are dead and a police officer is wounded after a shooting in south Louisiana.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Jail Hosts Father-Daughter Dance for Incarcerated Dads
"The No. 1 one way to break the cycle and to break recidivism is to reunite the families," the program director said.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Aaron Hernandez’s primary accuser returns to stand for 4th day
The star prosecution witness in the double murder trial of Aaron Hernandez returns to the stand Thursday for a fourth day of testimony.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Cops: White teen falsely accused 3 black men of rape
Breana Talbott told police she was kidnapped and raped by three black men wearing masks, but cops had suspicions about her story "almost immediately"

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Judge rejects plea to cut triple killer’s sentence
WOBURN - Triple killer Daniel LaPlante will not be released early, a Superior Court judge ruled Thursday.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Gov. wants to save $4M by replacing prison guards with cameras
Gov. Bruce Rauner wants to replace guards in watchtowers with closed-circuit cameras at nearly two dozen lower-security Illinois prisons, an effort to cut expenses for a cash-strapped state that has gone two years without a budget.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Court gives thief a break with shoplifting ruling
Shoplifting isn’t limited to swiping something from a store shelf, but also includes breaking into a coin box at a laundromat, a state appeals court ruled Wednesday in a victory for criminal defendants.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Freed inmate hijacks car in Calif. jail parking lot, authorities say
A Hesperia woman got out of jail Wednesday afternoon, hopped into a car parked outside and drove away.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
They worked hard to keep their kids safe. Then they lost one to gunfire
Ayana McAllister’s mother and father struggled Wednesday to absorb their daughter’s death. The college student, home on spring break, was killed in a D.C. shooting.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Senate Votes to Let ISPs Sell Your Data Without Consent
The measure, which the only Democratic member of the FCC said opens 'a massive gap in consumer protection law,' still has to pass the House and be signed by the president.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Twitter explores premium version after 11 years as a free service
<p>Twitter Inc (TWTR.N) is considering whether to build a premium version of its network aimed at professionals, the company said on Thursday, raising the possibility that it could collect subscription fees from some users for the first time.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
The Pros and Cons of Buying an iPhone Directly From Apple
<p>Is it time for consumers to start buying their iPhones directly from Apple instead of their cell-phone carrier?</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Facebook Messenger rolls out mention alerts and message Reaction emoji
<p>Group chat will get a bit less chaotic with the global rollout of two Facebook Messenger features it was previously testing in Vietnam.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Instagram finally offers two-factor authentication for everyone
Instagram announced today that two-factor authentication is available to everyone who uses its app, and all we have to say is “Well, it’s about time!”&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Minecraft players, beware fake ‘mods’ on Google Play
<p>It could be “game over” for Minecraft fans who downloaded unauthorized mods (modifications) for their Android smartphone or tablet.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Former Googler wants to help you get more likes on social media
With Post Intelligence, the woman who helped build Google+ thinks AI can get you more "likes."

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
These 12 surprising things are killing your office Wi-Fi
Think twice before you set up the office aquarium.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Odd-looking device sticks to your neck to help you sleep better
It aims to relieve stress and "encourage restful sleep and relaxation."

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
New BlackBerry app keeps people from peeping at your screen
There are lots of times when people around us can see what’s on our phone screens.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
iPhone users, do not try this potentially dangerous Siri prank
Police departments across the U.S. are speaking out after a viral iPhone prank spreads among teens

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Intel’s bold plan to reinvent computer memory
<p>Intel just unleashed a new kind of computer memory it believes will fundamentally change the way the world builds computers. But it won’t tell the world what’s inside.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
6 expected features of iPhone 8
<p>While the launch of Apple’s 2017 flagship iPhone is still months away, iPhone 8 rumors have kept the hype around the device alive.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Apple acquires popular automation app Workflow
<p>Apple has finalized a deal to acquire Workflow today — a tool that lets you hook together apps and functions within apps in strings of commands to automate tasks.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Google adds audio-only calls to Duo, file sharing to Allo
<p>oogle said on Wednesday it would offer an audio-only option on its Duo video calls service to help users communicate using poor-quality connections, and was adding a feature to permit file sharing in group chats on its Allo messaging App.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
'Super Mario Run' lands on Android a day early
<p>Nintendo notoriously resisted making any of its games available on mobile platforms, a significant move for a company that's been making handheld titles for almost three decades.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Facebook now lets you broadcast live video from a PC
<p>Facebook Live is making the jump from phones to computers, as Facebook announced today that it’s opening up its live-streaming service to desktop and laptops in addition to smartphones and mobile devices for all its users.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Samsung Galaxy S8 could have a 3-month refund policy
<p>If you wind up buying and disliking the Samsung Galaxy S8, which launches March 29 in New York, you might be able to return it fuss-free for up to three months, according to according The Investor, citing Korean outlet Chosun Biz.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
World War ll Veteran Gets $300,000 Winning Lottery Ticket For His 94th Birthday
He said he will still be conservative with his spending.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Boy thanks doctors, students who saved his life
CBS2's Carolyn Gusoff reports.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Girl sell record 100,100 boxes of Girl Scout cookies
Katie Francis Uses Her Girl Scout Cookie Earnings For Good To Help Others In The Community

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Va. woman showing friend how to play lotto game wins $1M
Pair of friends used a self-service lottery machine -- and one went home a winner with a lump sum totaling $630,915 before taxes

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
10-year-old sells drawings to buy toys for sick little brother
For the last three months, 10-year-old Haden has set up shop on the front lawn of his Lincolnton, North Carolina, home.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Kid writes letter requesting park swing for brother with disabilities
After visiting a new local park, 8-year-old Naomi Gwynne had an important request for the “park builders.”&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Inspired By Her Son, Mom Creates Milestone Cards for Premature Babies
"I mostly want other preemie moms to know they are not alone," said Amy Purling, who's son James was born 10 weeks premature.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Military son surprises mom at her graduation
<p>Penny Pearson thought her husband was going to pin her for her pinning ceremony when she graduated from nursing school. Her son, home from a deployment in Kuwait and Iraq, surprised her instead.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Soda-bottle arm brings little boy new hope
Ziad Mohammed was born without arms or legs, and his family can't afford prosthetics, so his father crafted the next best thing: hope

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Off-duty nurse saves stranger's life after sudden collapse
An off-duty nurse was in the right place at the right time Sunday when a man suffered a medical emergency at a gymnastics event.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
She’s 17 years old and already helping patients with brain injuries
Indrani Das studied the mechanics behind neuron death and took home a $250,000 prize.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Oil giant surprises grieving father behind mystery memorial
For 12 years, Ray Olson tended a memorial for his only son, killed in a crash involving a drunk driver, anonymously in the dark of night.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Newborns named Romeo and Juliet delivered just hours apart
"I had told them that if they want to book me now as their wedding photographer they could do that"

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Swimmers with Down syndrome empowered in the pool
<p>Jackson, 18, and his teammates Aaron Coomes, 15, and Jake Manning, 16, are all swimmers at Waggener High School. They all have Down syndrome. And all three boys are doing what their parents had never previously thought possible — competing alongside mainstream kids.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Rosie the Riveter finally gets national day of recognition
<p>Seven decades after World War Two ended, a surviving handful of the women who marched into factories and shipyards, redefining workplace gender roles to help keep America's military assembly lines running, will be honored on Tuesday.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Shelter dog now 'local hero' for saving life of 3-year-old girl
A dog who survived horrific animal cruelty saved the life of a 3-year-old girl, according to an animal shelter in Escanaba, Michigan, which shared information about the dog’s heroics in a Facebook post titled “Former Abused Shelter Dog Now Local Hero.”

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Ohio teen creates promposal using app to map 5.5-mile run
They're both runners, so when an Ohio teen asked his new girlfriend to the prom, he ran 5.5 miles to spell out a promposal on an app.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
4 most depressing reasons why Americans are not saving any money
<p>People are more confident about their finances, but should they be?</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Washington is now officially holding the stock market hostage
Markets could become more volatile now that they are hostage to a Congress that has shown it may not easily fall in line behind President Trump's policies.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Trumps plot big hotel expansion, but political problems loom
The Trump family is launching a new hotel chain in a bold expansion of a company that critics say is already...

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
The case for saving less for retirement
Was it a mistake to load up my 401(k)? Thomas Anderson thinks so.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
'Bro, I’m going rogue': Wall Street informant double-crossed the FBI
On the night he cut a deal with the FBI, Guy Gentile was on his way to a Connecticut casino for his cousin’s bachelor party.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
6 steps to get 'super rich,' from a man who went from broke to millions
"What I have created financially in my life is very simple," says Grant Cardone.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Haunting photos of retail apocalypse reveal a new normal in America
<p>The retail apocalypse has descended on America.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Even Germany's post office is trying to build an electric car
This boxy, bare-bones van has no air conditioning or radio, no passenger seat and a top speed of less than 50 miles an hour.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
10 places with the highest rates of car theft in the US
Living in these metro areas may require more work to give you peace of mind about your car's security.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Bill Gates, trillionaire? Warren Buffett shows how it will happen
The Microsoft founder is making money faster than he can spend it.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
This is what's behind the severe housing drought
The supply of homes for sale is now at the lowest level since the National Association of Realtors began tracking inventory 18 years ago.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
5 biggest takeaways from Thursday's Sweet 16 games
Thursday night provided the benefit of a hotly contested first weekend of play -– eight worthy and talented teams squared off in search of spot in the Elite Eight.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Xavier upsets Arizona to reach Elite Eight
<p>Trevon Bluiett scored 25 points, Sean O'Mara scored inside with 40 seconds left and No. 11 seed Xavier upset No. 2 Arizona 73-71 in the West Region on Thursday night.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
MLB's top 8 defensive stars heading into 2017
When it comes to measuring top players, offensive numbers seem to be the go-to statistics, but that’s just not fair.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Vegas or New Orleans: What's the best spot for Manziel?
What's the better city for free agent QB Johnny Manziel to play in: New Orleans or Las Vegas? #120Talk

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Top-seeded Gonzaga survives to beat West Virginia
<p>Jordan Mathews hit the go-ahead 3-pointer with under a minute to play and top-seeded Gonzaga survived a rough shooting night for both teams to beat No. 4 seed West Virginia 61-58 Thursday night to advance to the West Regional final.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
NFL announces rule proposals to enhance safety
Most are aimed at better player safety. Players may also get more leeway to celebrate.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Report: Romo-Garrett relationship strained after speech
Tony Romo and Jason Garrett used to have a close relationship beyond being just a quarterback and coach.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Oregon downs Michigan to reach Elite Eight
<p>Tyler Dorsey scored 20 points and made the go-ahead layup with 1:08 left, and third-seeded Oregon ended No. 7 Michigan's dramatic postseason run with a 69-68 victory in a Midwest Regional semifinal on Thursday night.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
ESPN personalities upset over network’s promotion of LaVar Ball
LaVar Ball has been everywhere the past month or so, and there seems to be no end in sight to his ubiquitousness.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
LeBron cracks list of world's greatest leaders
​It says a lot about the public's perception of LeBron James that he would be included on a list that features the likes of Theo Epstein and the Pope, for goodness sake.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Goodell 'fine' with Trump's comments on Kaepernick
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell seemingly attempted to keep the league above the political fray by indicating he’s fine with Donald Trump’s recent comments about Colin Kaepernick.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
No. 1 seed Kansas routs Purdue to reach Elite Eight
<p>Player of the year front-runner Frank Mason III poured in 26 points, Kansas turned on the jets in the second half and the top-seeded Jayhawks soared to a 98-66 blowout of No. 4 seed Purdue on Thursday night in the Midwest Regional semifinals.</p>

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
With Cavs faltering, will Celtics take East's top spot?
The Celtics moved one game closer to the top of the Eastern Conference standings on Wednesday night. Will Boston catch the Cavaliers? #120Talk

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
NCAA Tournament bracket, predictions


POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Bob Huggins tries to make sense of officiating in West Virginia loss
The Mountaineers shot only 26.2% in foul-filled game.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Report: Sean Payton has ‘taken an interest’ in Manziel
Johnny Manziel remains in NFL limbo as he continues to stage his football comeback.&nbsp;

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001
Report: Nation's top recruit released from letter of intent
It looks like Michael Porter Jr. will get his wish.

POSTED JANUARY 01, 0001

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